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Reclaimed Oak Tag

reclaimed-antique-granary-oak-texture
Oct 13 2017

Granary Oak — From the Farmlands to America’s Homes

Throughout America’s farmlands, structures are built specifically to store grain. Today, these storage buildings -- called granaries -- are typically made of metal. But years ago, they were constructed of wood. Mountain Lumber’s Granary Oak® brings the warm beauty of granary woods to today’s clients, with reclaimed barn wood that is filled with historic character. Mountain Lumber’s Granary Oak is available in both distressed and planed antique surfaces. Its unusual grain patterns, saw-tooth etchings and other distinguishing character marks tell a story in any space the wood is present. To preserve the historic markings and natural patina of Granary Oak, we hand sand each board slightly. The result is a one-of-a-kind floor, every time. This original patina American oak can be made into solid and engineered flooring or paneling in a range of custom finishes. We currently have it available at Mountain Lumber in the following specs: Solid Flooring Specs Available FSC® Certified Plank Face Widths: 3″- 10″ Plank Thickness: 3/4″ Plank Length: 2′ – 12′ Engineered Flooring Specs Available FSC® Certified Plank Face Widths: 3″-7″ Plank Thickness: 5/8″, 3/4″ Plank Length: 16″ – 10′ Talk to us today about availability and options. And infuse American history into your next project....

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New Life to Old Lumber

We recently helped a high-end designer in New York City capture a more modern feel to their space using a versatile wood – Rich with history. We custom finished reclaimed oak sourced from Appalachian barns for the project, developing the finish and applying by hand at our shop in Ruckersville, Virginia. Antique oak is an exceptionally stable platform for flooring, posts and beams. It can hold up under the most extreme conditions and continue to look stunning, the perfect balance for this new project. When sourcing reclaimed oak, we inspect every piece, grade each on varying degrees of character and quality, and remove all the nails by hand. We retain the nail holes and other scars to celebrate the wood’s history. For centuries, oak was used to build barns and other structures that have come to define Americana. Much of our reclaimed oak is recovered with chestnut, poplar, hickory and pine. An essential part of farm life, barns constructed through the early part of the 19th century were typically built using trees growing closest to the property. The beams, being larger elements of the structures, were limited in size to what could be moved by man and horse. The wood was either hand-hewn using an axe or squared with an adze. Early settlers also recognized the value of oak from its European subspecies and used red, white, black, scarlet, willow, post and pin varieties to build their barns as well. These varieties are still available in new growth today, but develop a very different appearance after years of being subjected to natural and human elements. ...

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